About Contracts
Emergency Forms
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The need for contracts

The Collie Club of America strongly urges all members to use contracts when they sell or place puppies. These contracts are intended to be templates or samples for our members use. Contracts are the paperwork cornerstones of both a puppy's future and future puppies. Sound puppy/dog sales contracts and stud dog contracts can make a tremendous difference in the futures of dogs and the futures of the relationships between their people. It is a good idea, therefore, to review your contract formats and to incorporate constructive changes at regular intervals.

The contract process is based on creating understanding between individuals and on assuring the long-term, indeed, lifelong, well-being of the dog(s). The contract must detail the responsibilities of each party while anticipating anything that might occur in the future that could change the status of the dog(s). The document needs to be comprehensive, while at the same time, relatively simple. It needs to be solid in its intent and format but flexible enough to reflect the needs of the individual parties involved. A good contract is, in other words, a piece of art in its own right.

These contracts can be downloaded and edited to include kennel names etc. We encourage everyone using these contracts to keep the basic elements of responsible breeding in the content. We have also included a Health Record and Medical Information form and an Additional Information form about Collies. We feel it is important for the new collie owner to have as much information about our breed and their puppy that their breeder can provide for them. The use of contracts protects the buyer and protects the breeder, but most importantly, it protects the collie. That should be the first and foremost concern for all of us.

The need for contracts

The Collie Club of America strongly urges all members to use contracts when they sell or place puppies. These contracts are intended to be templates or samples for our members use. Contracts are the paperwork cornerstones of both a puppy's future and future puppies. Sound puppy/dog sales contracts and stud dog contracts can make a tremendous difference in the futures of dogs and the futures of the relationships between their people. It is a good idea, therefore, to review your contract formats and to incorporate constructive changes at regular intervals.

The contract process is based on creating understanding between individuals and on assuring the long-term, indeed, lifelong, well-being of the dog(s). The contract must detail the responsibilities of each party while anticipating anything that might occur in the future that could change the status of the dog(s). The document needs to be comprehensive, while at the same time, relatively simple. It needs to be solid in its intent and format but flexible enough to reflect the needs of the individual parties involved. A good contract is, in other words, a piece of art in its own right.

These contracts can be downloaded and edited to include kennel names etc. We encourage everyone using these contracts to keep the basic elements of responsible breeding in the content. We have also included a Health Record and Medical Information form and an Additional Information form about Collies. We feel it is important for the new collie owner to have as much information about our breed and their puppy that their breeder can provide for them. The use of contracts protects the buyer and protects the breeder, but most importantly, it protects the collie. That should be the first and foremost concern for all of us.

Dog Emergency Forms

Whether we are working with a puppy buyer or getting our own affairs in order, we need to arrange for many different possible scenarios which might impact the care of the dog(s). It is important that dogs be cared for 24/7/365. Puppy buyers need to be made aware of this, and we need to think about coverage for our own dogs in any and all situations. One of the situations that puts a dog at the most risk is travel away from home by people and dogs separately or together. Many dogs are lost each year by traveling families. This can be essentially prevented by permanent ID's such as microchips and registry with a national database such as the AKC's HOME AGAIN companion animal recovery system in addition to the normal collar tags. If a dog owner is suddenly incapacitated by illness or accident while away from home, however, both the traveling dogs(s) and dog(s) left at home face a different set of potential risks.

Emergency personnel are tasked with caring for people rather than animals. Their protocols dictate that local animal control officers or police take custody of animals left behind by injured or ill patients treated by medical personnel. This will involve the removal of the animal(s) to an animal shelter, where local ordinances will determine their care, treatment, and disposition. This is a worst nightmare scenario for most of us. Especially on short trips, animals left at home may fare even worse than traveling animals with minimal arrangements made for such essentials as food, water, and shelter.

It is obvious that back up plans are needed. It takes a village to maintain a dog, as it does to raise a child. Part of a dog's village is emergency coverage, which is most critical when the owner travels or if the owner lives alone. The Breeders Education Committee suggests that travelers and dog owners who live alone carry an Emergency Form with them to cover both traveling animals and animals left at home. The form needs to clearly identify all dogs both traveling and at home with any special care requirements such as medication to be given or medication to which the dog is sensitive. It needs to clearly identify the dog owner, the dog's regular veterinarian and the back up caregiver and indicate financial responsibility for any expenses incurred by the dog. Following are two sample emergency forms, one designed for owners of show dogs and the other for pet owners. They cover all the emergency essentials outlined above and can be adapted to one dog or many or to multiple types of animals: dogs, cats, birds, etc.

Beyond the plans that we suggest you make for your animals when you travel, there are the more permanent plans that are needed for your animals as part of your estate. The terminology of wills and trusts has very specific legal definitions that define the status of animals, monies left for their support, and the options and obligations of your heirs. The specifics of this can vary from state to state, so the only way to be truly sure that your wishes will be carried out to the fullest extent of the law in your state is to consult your estate attorney.

Dog Emergency Forms

Whether we are working with a puppy buyer or getting our own affairs in order, we need to arrange for many different possible scenarios which might impact the care of the dog(s). It is important that dogs be cared for 24/7/365. Puppy buyers need to be made aware of this, and we need to think about coverage for our own dogs in any and all situations. One of the situations that puts a dog at the most risk is travel away from home by people and dogs separately or together. Many dogs are lost each year by traveling families. This can be essentially prevented by permanent ID's such as microchips and registry with a national database such as the AKC's HOME AGAIN companion animal recovery system in addition to the normal collar tags. If a dog owner is suddenly incapacitated by illness or accident while away from home, however, both the traveling dogs(s) and dog(s) left at home face a different set of potential risks.

Emergency personnel are tasked with caring for people rather than animals. Their protocols dictate that local animal control officers or police take custody of animals left behind by injured or ill patients treated by medical personnel. This will involve the removal of the animal(s) to an animal shelter, where local ordinances will determine their care, treatment, and disposition. This is a worst nightmare scenario for most of us. Especially on short trips, animals left at home may fare even worse than traveling animals with minimal arrangements made for such essentials as food, water, and shelter.

It is obvious that back up plans are needed. It takes a village to maintain a dog, as it does to raise a child. Part of a dog's village is emergency coverage, which is most critical when the owner travels or if the owner lives alone. The Breeders Education Committee suggests that travelers and dog owners who live alone carry an Emergency Form with them to cover both traveling animals and animals left at home. The form needs to clearly identify all dogs both traveling and at home with any special care requirements such as medication to be given or medication to which the dog is sensitive. It needs to clearly identify the dog owner, the dog's regular veterinarian and the back up caregiver and indicate financial responsibility for any expenses incurred by the dog. Following are two sample emergency forms, one designed for owners of show dogs and the other for pet owners. They cover all the emergency essentials outlined above and can be adapted to one dog or many or to multiple types of animals: dogs, cats, birds, etc.

Beyond the plans that we suggest you make for your animals when you travel, there are the more permanent plans that are needed for your animals as part of your estate. The terminology of wills and trusts has very specific legal definitions that define the status of animals, monies left for their support, and the options and obligations of your heirs. The specifics of this can vary from state to state, so the only way to be truly sure that your wishes will be carried out to the fullest extent of the law in your state is to consult your estate attorney.

Downloads

All documents are in Microsoft Word format.

> Puppy Sales Contract (71KB)

> Stud Dog Contract (72KB)

> Addendum to Agreements (69KB)

> Health Record and Medical Information (71KB)

> More Information About Collies (72KB)

> Collie Emergency List (118KB)

> The Collie Standard (80KB)

> Dog Will Disposition (20KB)

> AKC Incapacitation Authorization Notice (83KB)

Contact

Patt Caldwell
pcaldwel@gmail.com

Downloads

All documents are in Microsoft Word format.

> Puppy Sales Contract (71KB)

> Stud Dog Contract (72KB)

> Addendum to Agreements (69KB)

> Health Record and Medical Information (71KB)

> More Information About Collies (72KB)

> Collie Emergency List (118KB)

> The Collie Standard (80KB)

> Dog Will Disposition (20KB)

> AKC Incapacitation Authorization Notice (83KB)

Contact

Patt Caldwell
pcaldwel@gmail.com

Please send all questions to ccasec@tctelco.net
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